Results

Is Your United Way Successful?

Thumbs-up.jpg

Recently, I saw an interesting editorial from a United Way CEO about how their United Way is changing the way it addresses social issues in their community. The editorial explained some of the social issues and needs in the community and outlined the role of United Way in addressing those needs. What caught my attention, though, was not what the United Way is going to do to address those needs, but how they are going to measure their success.

Before I share their measurement of success, it will be helpful to look at two of the most common ways United Ways measure success. For many years, measuring success revolved around how much money a United Way raised – the campaign goal. The campaign goal was often represented by thermometers that would spring up all over town during campaign season. You can read more about campaign goals and thermometers in these blog posts.

In the past 20 years or so, United Ways have turned to measuring success by the number of people who have been helped. For example, a representative of United Way of the Alberta Capital Region was talking about leaving the campaign goal behind and said, “So instead of bringing forward a financial target, I ask … how many do you want to help in our community?” United Ways that measure success in this way will often include information about the number of people helped by funded programs, or the will make a broader statement like “7,418 children, individuals and families participated in United Way funded programs last year.” This evolution in measuring success is largely the result of United Ways adopting some form of community impact.

The quote that caught my attention comes from the United Way of Tarrant County’s president and CEO, who said in an editorial article, “Central to our beliefs, we know it is time to measure our results not by the number of people we’ve helped, but by the number of people who no longer need help.”

On the surface, measuring success by the number of people who no longer need help does not seem like such a big deal because United Way of Tarrant County is still counting people. But, if you look at the people helped by a local organization, like a food pantry for example, people may be returning to the food pantry every month. Until their underlying challenges have been addressed, they will continue to need help. When you count the number of people who no longer need help, your success becomes the number of lives that have been changed.

We have been helping United Ways transition to measuring their success by counting people who no longer need help for years. We call these United Ways issue-focused, and we help them to set goals like “United, we will lift 15,000 families out of poverty by 2028” (United Way of Pierce County) or “By 2025, all Skagit children entering kindergarten are ready to learn” (United Way of Skagit County). These United Ways and many others are focused on changing conditions in their communities, so people no longer need help.

If you are looking at how you define and measure success for your United Way, consider the possibility of measuring the number of people who no longer need help. United Ways that are issue-focused are not only changing their communities in powerful ways, but they are changing their United Ways as well.

When issue-focused United Ways measure the number of people who no longer need help, they become more relevant to their donors and community. When issue-focused United Ways measure the number of people who no longer need help, they become more sustainable as they grow and diversify resources. When issue-focused United Ways measure the number of people who no longer need help, they become more impactful as they change lives in their community.

If your United Way is interested in the possibility of defining success by measuring the number of people who no longer need help in your community, let us know. Our Challenges and Opportunities Retreat or our Introduction to an Issue Focus Retreat will help your United Way to decide how best to measure your success and you can learn more about how we transform United Ways to an issue focus here.

Three New Year’s Resolutions Your United Way Should Keep

newyearsfireworks.jpg

Tis the season! It’s that time of year again when, with ample confidence and overwhelming exuberance, we prepare our New Year’s resolutions. As you contemplate your personal New Year’s resolutions for 2019, there is no reason not to prepare a New Year’s resolution or three for your United Way as well. In the spirit of holiday giving and sharing, we have three resolutions that your United Way should keep.

1. Stop Using Jargon. Why put it off any longer? You know jargon is bad for you, your donors, your community, and your United Way. Make 2019 the year you put an end to using words and phrases that confuse, bemuse, and bewilder anyone outside of your office walls. United Ways are so effusive in their use of jargon that we had a jargon contest in 2016 just to see if United Way staff could tell “real” United Way jargon from “computer generated” United Way jargon.

While words like “allocations process,” “collective impact,” and “core service investments” may cause excitement that borders on hysteria among your staff, your community and donors have no idea what these words mean. Their eyes glaze over at the sound of “fund distribution,” “investment products,” and “key influence sectors.” Using these words outside of the office only serves to push donors and the community further away. You can – and must – tell your United Way story without jargon.

In 2019, make it your United Way’s New Year’s resolution to stop using jargon outside the office. Appoint someone to be your office “Jargon-Buster” responsible for ensuring that your campaign brochures, emails, website, and other communication materials are jargon-free.

2. Help Your Donors Succeed. You would hardly think United Ways need this resolution, until you realize that many United Ways go out of their way to make it difficult for their donors to succeed. When donors succeed, they feel like they have made their community a better place.

Do donors support your United Way because of how much money it raises? No, so examples like thermometers don’t help donors succeed and have got to go.

Instead, show donors how they make a difference by contributing to United Way. Donors will succeed when United Ways share the issue they address, the actions they are taking to address the issue, and the results they are achieving.

When you allow donors to designate their contribution, what does that mean for United Way? It means that other nonprofit organizations are doing a better job at making your donors successful.

Our research has found that there are donors in every community who designate but would consider supporting United Way instead if they understood what United Way accomplishes. Focus the message of your United Way so that donors will successfully recognize the opportunities to make a difference in your community.

In 2019, examine everything your United Way does to make sure it helps your donors succeed. Stop doing what doesn’t help donors succeed and start doing what donors need to succeed. After a year of helping your donors succeed, we can talk about more mundane resolutions like losing weight.

3. Understand Why Your United Way Exists. The eternal, existential question of why your United Way exists is a question you must be able to answer to know when you are successful.

Sadly, most United Way boards cannot tell you why their United Way exists or the purpose of their United Way. Well, let me refine that a little. If you ask a board of 20 people why United Way exists, you are likely to get 20 different answers. On a single board, it is not uncommon for board members to offer a variety of reasons for why their United Way exists, including: to help people, to raise money for local organizations, to provide donors a single place to make their charitable contribution, to make sure local nonprofits are accountable and effective, to understand and address the community’s needs, to help families, to end homelessness, to halt hunger. The list of purposes board members might identify goes on endlessly.

If boards of directors express such a diversity of belief as to why their United Way exists, is it any surprise when donors or the community do not know what their local United Way does? The reason your United Way exists could be entirely different from the United Way in the next county, which makes it even more important to be able to clearly articulate your answer. For your United Way to succeed, your board must have a clear consensus as to why your United Way exists.

Make understanding why your United Way exists one of your resolutions for 2019. What you will find, once your board agrees on why your United Way exists, is an incredible focus in your work. Your board will be able to go out and talk with one voice about why people should give, advocate, and volunteer at your United Way. Your staff will understand what the board values and expects United Way to accomplish. Your donors will support United Way knowing what their contribution will be enabling. Your community will understand how United Way fits into the larger fabric of the nonprofit and social service organizations in your area.  

Those are the three resolutions that we think your United Way should keep in 2019. However, we know that sticking to resolutions isn’t always easy, so our next blog post will share with you our guide for staying resolute in your resolutions.

We wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Best wishes for a successful and rewarding 2019! Now, go get a head start on those resolutions!

Gary 2017 Blog Signature NEW.png
 

Taking Our Own Advice

We got a facelift.

Homepage August 2018.jpg

You may have noticed and been too polite to say anything. But that’s OK – we’re not ashamed of the work we’ve had done. Actually, we’re proud because the experience of totally stripping down and rebuilding reminded us why we’re here.

Of course, we don’t mean that we’ve had our faces redone – we mean that we redid our website.

Redesigning our website wasn’t easy; it meant facing the fact that we haven’t been following our own advice.

Prior to its facelift, our website was laden with excruciating detail about our processes – how we run board retreats, how we conduct donor research, etc. This made our website was dull and overwhelming. Our web pages were so overwhelming that almost no one took the time to read them, so what we had to offer to clients wasn’t easily understood.

Additionally, the content and design of our website were dated, so despite our consistent good work in the real world, we did not appear relevant.

Redesigning our website was an exercise in empathy. Getting bogged down in discussions of process and struggling to assert relevance despite a portfolio of good work are challenges faced by many United Ways. The opportunity to be in their shoes reminded us why Perspectives exists.

The fact of the matter is that changing the way you’ve always done things is challenging, which is why it’s helpful to have expert guides for the journey. Our adventure into the world of website design did not happen alone. We were guided by our long-time graphic designer, two exceptional copywriters and proofreaders, and the wisdom of several United Way CEOs to make our transition successful.

While our transition took a few months, our path to clear messaging and relevance was relatively straight-forward thanks to the help of our many guides. However, the transformation that most United Ways need to make to assure their relevance, sustainability, impactfulness and clear messaging is far more complex.

We have always seen ourselves as guides for United Ways, but being on the opposite end of the process – facing a change that we knew needed to happen – reminded us of the power of experienced guides.

The best guides prepare you for obstacles before you can even see them and make even the most challenging paths traversable.

Perspectives exists to be the best guide possible for United Ways that desire relevant, sustainable, and deeply impactful futures. While our look may have changed, our commitment to that mission has not. If you believe your United Way exists to impact your community, we are here to help you do that.

To learn more about how we help United Ways ensure their relevance, sustainability, and impactfulness for years to come, check out our newly updated services page or see how our guidance is helping one United Way make real impact on the issue of poverty.

After you have had a chance to take a look at our new website, please feel free to share your thoughts with us at sarah-and-gary@perspectives4uw.com.